Will eating Tigernut Butter make you healthier?

Tiger nuts, despite their name, are not nuts. Like potatoes, these are marble-sized tubers that grow underground. They come from the sedge family of grasses. It grows in the wild over Africa, the Middle East, India, and Southern Europe.

Farmers dislike them when they’re found in the fields of other crops since they’re a weed that causes chaos. When grown specifically for this purpose, the majority of them are utilized to manufacture a dairy-free beverage. It’s known as atadwe milk in Western Africa. Horchata de chufa is the Spanish name for it. Tiger nuts are typically dried and roasted with honey in addition to milk. Raw is a less common method of consumption. Tiger nuts can be used to make dairy-free yogurt, ice cream, and even bread when mixed into flour.

It’s unclear where their English nickname came from. It’s probably because of their orangish-brown and white design. The colors are close to tiger fur in appearance. They were given to American children in place of candy during WWII. Candy-making sugar was rationed, thus these have a natural sweetness to them. While tigers have never lived in Africa, where the majority of tigers were imported from, it’s conceivable that this wild animal moniker was picked because it was amusing and implied they came from a faraway land.

Tiger nuts are also known as earth almond, earth nut, yellow nut sedge, and chufa. Their scientific name is Cyperus esculentus (in Spanish). None of these terms have anything to do with tigers, so that’s not why they’re called that. Tiger nuts were carefully grown and regarded as exceedingly valuable in Ancient Egypt. They were both food and medicine.

“How does it taste?” is one of the most critical questions to ask before trying something new. Tiger nuts have a texture that is difficult to explain. It feels like you’re holding a firm fig when you grip it. It’s slightly chewy on the inside. You’ll be greeted with a fibrous center that tastes nutty, gritty, and pleasantly sweet once you’ve cracked through the hard outer covering. It tastes like a combination of sweet potato, almond, and pecan, and it’s topped with a flavor that’s unique to its name.

Tiger nuts, particularly tiger nut butter, are now utilized in a variety of cuisines. They’re also paleo-friendly, as well as being vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free. They’re also suitable for folks who follow a raw vegan diet. Tiger nut butter is created by soaking entire tiger nuts in water for 24 to 48 hours, similar to peanut butter. It’s then drained, diced, and blended with oil and honey in a food processor until a smooth mixture develops. Some folks don’t use honey because tiger nut butter is inherently sweet. Fresh fruit, pastries like ice creams and pies, and even vegetable slices go well with it.

Apart from their excellent nutritional value, some people think they’re the “ideal snack” because they’re, well, difficult to eat. People are discouraged from eating too many of them because of their tough exterior. On the plus side, they’re fantastic for folks who wish to strengthen their jaws!

When tiger nuts are ground into butter, they have a creamy, sweet feel comparable to almond or cashew butter. When served with their favorite dessert, some people claim it has a vanilla or coconut aftertaste. Tiger nut butter doesn’t have the same stick-to-your-roof texture as peanut butter, nor is it as thick as sunflower seed butter.

Tiger nuts aren’t actual nuts, and there’s no evidence that they cause allergic reactions in people who are allergic to peanuts or tree nuts. Because they’re plant-based, the milk they produce is lactose-free. Tiger nuts are gluten-free since they’re a tuber rather than a gluten-containing grain.

Tigernut butter is high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals such as magnesium, potassium, vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc, and other nutrients. In fact, our forefathers could extract enough nutrients from a tiger nut-based diet to meet 80 percent of their daily calorie requirements in about 2.5 to 3 hours during prehistoric times. Despite the fact that we aren’t as active as we once were, it is still a really nutritious addition to our morning table.

Cashews and pistachios are the ideal nuts for weight loss because they each have roughly 160 calories per ounce. Tiger nuts have 135 calories per 1 ounce serving, which is 15-20% less than cashews, pistachios, peanuts, and almonds. They’re over 25% cheaper than walnuts and 30% cheaper than macadamia nuts. Their reduced calorie count, along with their increased fiber content, makes them an excellent diet snack.

The high fiber content of the tiger nut inhibits sugar absorption in the stomach, which helps to keep blood sugar levels in balance. Tigernuts are also high in the amino acid arginine, which helps to reduce blood sugar levels by increasing insulin synthesis and sensitivity. In addition, because it includes a significant amount of sucrose, tiger nut butter is an excellent substitute for carbs that elevate blood sugar levels.

Tiger nuts are high in fiber, which is a nutrient that helps to keep the digestive system in good shape. Tigernut butter is also thought to include resistant starch, a form of fiber. Resistant starch nourishes the good bacteria in your stomach, allowing your digestion to function more smoothly. As a result, constipation, uncomfortable gas, bloating, indigestion, and diarrhea are less likely with tiger nut butter.

The high fiber content of the tiger nut inhibits sugar absorption in the stomach, which helps to keep blood sugar levels in balance. Tigernuts are also high in the amino acid arginine, which helps to reduce blood sugar levels by increasing insulin synthesis and sensitivity. In addition, because it includes a significant amount of sucrose, tiger nut butter is an excellent substitute for carbs that elevate blood sugar levels.

So if you haven’t tried it, take a shot at it. I spread it on bread!

Check out my related post: Why is bread served in brown paper?


Interesting reads:

https://www.realsimple.com/health/nutrition-diet/tiger-nuts

https://healthfreeinfo.com/uncategorized/will-eating-tigernut-butter-make-you-healthier/

https://organicallyaddison.com/tigernut-butter-recipe-nut-free-paleo/

https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/health-benefits-of-tiger-nuts/

https://www.tipsfu.com/tiger-nuts-butter/

https://www.superfoodly.com/benefits-of-tiger-nuts/

https://www.optimizedbiohacking.com/tiger-nut-butter/

https://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/will-eating-tigernut-butter-make-you-healthier/

https://www.healwithfood.org/recipes/tiger-nut-butter.php

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