Why do you need to Create Space?

We are living in extraordinary times. To begin with, we are witnessing a first in human history: the desire to create rather than fill space. We’ve been exploring, expanding, and filling up the immense area surrounding us for over a thousand generations. But now we’ve reached a stage where people are overburdened and overscheduled, and they need to clear some space to breathe.

We are living in extraordinary times. To begin with, we are witnessing a first in human history: the desire to create rather than fill space. We’ve been exploring, expanding, and filling up the immense area surrounding us for over a thousand generations. But now we’ve reached a stage where people are overburdened and overscheduled, and they need to clear some space to breathe.

Derek Draper set out to organize all of the ways that generating space might help you establish a better life and career with these two ideas in mind in his book, Create Space. There are four realms in total: thinking, connecting, doing, and being. And there are strategies to improve skills in contemplation, self-awareness, relationships, and productivity within each of these domains.

Self-awareness is required if you wish to excel in what you do. Whether you’re an artist, a corporation’s CFO, or an administrative assistant, knowing your own skills and weaknesses is a huge benefit. You’ll be better able to avoid difficulties, make more effective plans, and make better decisions if you have a higher level of self-awareness.

Reflection, or what some people refer to as “having a meaningful discussion with oneself,” is the key to knowing yourself. Great minds have championed the intellectual benefits of introspection since the days of Confucius and Socrates, but it also has a slew of practical advantages.

It can help you make better decisions and make fewer mistakes, for example. Before choosing any action, you should consider the potential consequences as well as any other possibilities. Then, after you’ve taken action, you should evaluate the results to see what went well and what didn’t. You will make fewer mistakes if you do this on a regular basis.

However, space is required for deep and profound reflection. In fact, four types of space are required: chronological, physical, relational, and mental space. Time and location are represented by temporal and physical space, respectively. Psychic space is about being open to improvement and feeding your mind fresh and enlightening information, whereas relational space refers to the value of having someone else to bounce ideas off of.

It took a lot of effort to create all of this space. CEOs often have less than 15% of their workweek available for solo work, according to a Harvard University research. And if CEOs can’t find time to reflect, the rest of the workforce isn’t likely to be able to either.

Even if you do locate a quiet place to reflect, it isn’t always simple. It might be difficult to tune out the countless distractions that pervade our days. Even more difficult is the fact that reflection does not always result in pleasant conclusions.

Reflecting on your previous activities may reveal that you made a mistake at the last managers meeting or that you treated your assistant inconsiderately. However, if you want to reap the benefits of self-awareness, you must face these uncomfortable realities. There are also advantages to being more aware.

Consider a study of commuters in the United Kingdom, which discovered that those who utilized their travel home to reflect on their day were happier and more productive than those who didn’t. As a result, create a location where you may reflect!

Having space to contemplate goes hand in hand with remaining open to learning. While reflecting on oneself is a great method to learn about yourself, you must also make room for learning by adopting the right mindset, one that is open to growth and development.

In general, people have one of two mindsets: fixed or growth. Fixed mindsets believe that learning stops at a certain point since the brain can only keep a certain amount of information, while growth mindsets believe that you can always learn more. However, the fixed mindset has been empirically discredited. Dr. Michael Merzenich, a neuroscientist, discovered that our brains are all “soft-wired” and capable of neuroplasticity. In other words, your brain is always evolving in response to the information you offer.

This means that a healthy brain can always learn, allowing us to grow and evolve in order to overcome our concerns. Take, for example, the fear of failing. One-third of all Americans, according to a 2015 survey, dread failure, with millennials being the most vulnerable. However, as pervasive as failure fear is, there is a simple solution: include failure into a growth mindset and accept it as a learning opportunity.

You must make an effort to establish a space for learning, just as you must make an effort to create a space for reflection. This entails setting aside time for self-improvement, as well as locating a suitable location and useful resources, such as a mentor.

The second type of space required for success is connecting space. Of course, this is highly beneficial in terms of strengthening connections. However, you won’t be able to form such partnerships until you first create a strong bond with yourself.

Creating a space to connect with oneself, like creating a space to reflect, is about looking within; this time, it’s about checking in to see what’s going on in both your body and mind. This entails paying attention to your feelings. We are all prone to powerful emotions as human beings, which can govern our behaviors and decision-making if we aren’t vigilant. However, by making a space to connect with yourself, you can check in on a regular basis and ensure that you, not your emotions, are in charge.

This can be accomplished in a variety of ways. A sensation and number check-in is one option. Here’s how to go about it. Take a few deep breaths and ask yourself, “How do I feel?” while sitting comfortably. Once you’ve identified an emotion, give it a strength rating on a range of one to ten. Then you can go on to physical sensations, such as tightness in your shoulders or chest, and assign a numerical value to them. Imagine yourself as an observer above it all, rather than the one caught in the center, if you’re feeling overwhelmed by a slew of conflicting feelings.

Checking in is fundamentally a form of emotional intelligence development. The level of someone’s emotional intelligence is shown in their ability to manage their own emotions, sustain relationships, and be compassionate.

Having a place to reflect and check in can help you develop emotional intelligence and put you in an excellent position to discover your core pathogenic beliefs, as the author describes them (CPBs).

It’s possible that you have a CPB if your career is stuck in a rut. Many CPBs are the outcome of previous events, often from infancy. To get to the bottom of issues, you’ll need to put in some work and space to think and connect.

It’s possible that you have a CPB if your career is stuck in a rut. Many CPBs are the outcome of previous events, often from infancy. To get to the bottom of issues, you’ll need to put in some work and space to think and connect.

For a worldwide beverage firm, the author worked with a team that was consistently missing its targets. Beata, the team leader, was upbeat and confident, but the team’s CPB became obvious quickly: they believed that in order to work successfully together, they had to always be polite. As a result, issues, worries, errors, and disputes were kept hidden and allowed to fester, harmed the team’s capacity to grow, develop, and perform at its best.

They became a team with space to share once this was discovered and remedied. This meant that problems, concerns, and mistakes could be expressed and resolved without fear of repercussions. This generated a vital sense of safety, allowing members to take risks and sometimes fail, which is an important part of learning and growing. Needless to say, with a revitalized feeling of purpose and vitality, the crew was quickly back on track.

Another approach to connect is to create space for people to interact to one another, which is incredibly beneficial in the development of solid relationships. Authors Duane and Catherine O’Kane present the findings of their clinical investigations in their book Real: The Power of Authentic Relationships (2016), which show that all of our problems can be linked back to relational issues. Low productivity and morale, high levels of stress, anxiety, and depression, whatever the problem, it can always be traced back to interpersonal conflicts.

Making time to connect and improve your connections can help you solve difficulties like these, and a stakeholder map is a wonderful way to figure out where to start. Put yourself in the centre of a piece of paper and draw lines to everyone in your life, from your partner and teammates to the security guard at work. Then, on a scale of one to 10, rank the relationships, with ten being the most profound and powerful.

Although not every relationship needs to be a 10, this map should help you figure out which ones need to be improved. It may seem like a lot of work, but the better your relationships are, the better you’ll feel and the better leader you’ll be.

While being spontaneous can be exhilarating for some, when it comes to being productive, the first thing to consider is planning. Many start-ups are hesitant to make long-term plans, yet flexibility is essential in a fast-changing market. However, there are several types of plans, and you may incorporate flexibility into a one- to three-year plan by holding monthly meetings to reassess your company’s goals and vision.

You must do two things in order to properly plan. Create a clear aim – what needs to be accomplished. Then, make a detailed plan for reaching that goal, including how it should be accomplished. The author understood he needed to write roughly 120,000 words when he decided to write Create Space. So he established a plan to accomplish this over the course of a year. He promised to writing 10,000 words every month, 2,500 words per week, and 500 words every day as part of that strategy. He was only human, thus he fell short on occasion. Other times, he outperformed his targets. What mattered was that the strategy kept him focused on completing the task.

Being productive and truly providing is obviously not the same as simply being busy. Darren preferred to put out fires rather than plan and be organized, preferring to “save the day.” This strategy made him feel valuable and important, and it kept him busy. He wasn’t, however, genuinely delivering. He was simply reacting to the mayhem he had produced.

Check out my related post: How to be free to focus?



Interesting reads:

https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/40748064-create-space

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s