How to “Let Me Out”? – Part 2

Embracing your inner child is a sure way to galvanize your project. Learn to utilize what’s called Kid-Thinking. It’s the powerful creative mind-set that cultivates curiosity and helps you overcome potential obstacles.

According to cognitive psychologist Anthony McCaffrey, creativity can be fostered by confronting what’s called functional fixedness. That’s the phenomenon by which we tend to observe the function of an object as fixed. What does this mean in practice? To jumpstart Kid-Thinking and use it against functional fixedness, think of an everyday object and try assigning it a variety of non-fixed roles. Say it’s a cup. Maybe it could become a teddy bear’s beanie, a paperweight or a cake tin.

Kid-Thinking emphasizes the importance of play, which is a process sure to stimulate our minds. The other benefit to Kid-Thinking is that it forces us to stay in the present moment and so remain positive in our search for creativity and solutions.

A Kid-Thinker, therefore, will keep pressing on and ignore the doubts that impede creative processes. In contrast, a Stuck-Thinker can’t look beyond temporary setbacks or negative thoughts.

Have a go at practicing this element of Kid-Thinking. Learn to detect the negative emotions that might otherwise hinder you. Once you get used to seeing things a different way, you can really free your mind to see things from other points of view as well. So the next time an employee at the coffee shop gets your order wrong, maybe you can recognize it wasn’t personal and there’s no need to be angry.

Or maybe you go to see a movie and it’s sold out. What then? Stay in the present. There’s no need to get upset. Remain zen and don’t get caught up in negative thoughts. If you’re able to practice keeping your composure and staying in the present, you’ll find it easier to make conscious and confident decisions. You’ll be able to focus your energy on positivity and use it for further creative endeavors.

You should now have a good idea of what you want to achieve. You know what creative tools to use and how to assuage any doubts. But there’s always room for improvement when it comes to motivation strategies.

Try imagining how your life will be once you’ve achieved your dream. Positive thoughts will contribute to a positive outcome. It’s called a FutureVision. Lots of people who begin songs, books or businesses start this way. Begin with the broad brushstrokes of a vision. After that, you can fill in the details. And once the details are in order you can start taking the little steps to make that dream a reality.

Marv will certainly have little to complain about if you have a clear goal and process in mind. Take five minutes and write your own FutureVision. Dream big. Where will you be in three years’ time? Where in the world will you live? Who will stay closest to you? What project or job will make you happy? Be specific and get down to brass tacks. You might well be surprised how much of it comes to fruition.

Another method for improving motivation is understanding that making mistakes is just part of the process. We all make them; there’s no shame in that. The trick is to learn from them. Have a think about past events that have made you unhappy, and why they affected you. That way you’ll be able to work out what your core values are and what keeps you motivated.

Say you’re a jazz musician and you accepted a job in a circus band to make ends meet. You had to play music you didn’t like, and you were morally opposed to their treatment of animals. By reflecting on exactly what made you unhappy, you won’t compromise your values in the future.

Meanwhile, forgive yourself and let yourself move on. Change is part of life. It’s scary. Sometimes it leads to good, sometimes to bad. It’s essential to learn to embrace both sides of the coin. If you can deal with change, you’ll be better equipped for the future.

Change is just part of the creative journey when you’re pursuing a dream. It’s easy to cope with positive change, like the arrival of new clients or a new publisher. You might take the credit for it, even if it is just plain old luck. The real difficulty is handling unwanted change that’s completely out of your control. But even then, there are lessons to be learned, and that process can itself be liberating. Identifying your own role and responsibility is critical.

Find five minutes to describe a negative change you experienced. Jot down everyone you had originally held culpable for it. It takes courage to admit that you were in some way at fault. Think what you could have done differently, so you don’t make similar errors in the future.

Once you’ve gleaned positive lessons from a bad experience, dwelling on it does no good. It paralyzes you. Accept what happened. Once you’ve let blame, pain or anger drift away, you’ll be in a better headspace for the adventure ahead.

It’s about exchange and keeping the joy alive. Nobody will expect perfection at the first attempt. And when you hit a wall you can always pick up the phone and work through it to get those creative juices flowing again.

So how do you create your own support network? Grab a pen and for two minutes collect names of people you’re certain will encourage your dream.

Don’t wait; contact one of them immediately and organize a meeting in person, by Skype or phone. If you don’t hear back, follow up with them not fewer than three times over the next three months.

What if you can’t think of anyone? Well, you’ve got to find them. Sign up for local interest groups, workshops or initiatives that are sympathetic to your mission. Put their meeting dates in your diary and be sure to attend.

Once you’ve created a list of names, dates and resources, don’t hide it away somewhere in a drawer. Display it prominently and use it! It’s normal to be afraid of starting something new, but instead of letting worries run endlessly through your head, get to work. There are ways to unblock your creativity, gain courage and try new things. If you feel stuck, try different approaches in your life or businesses. Actions engender change, and every little step brings you closer to realizing your creative dr

It’s normal to be afraid of starting something new, but instead of letting worries run endlessly through your head, get to work. There are ways to unblock your creativity, gain courage and try new things. If you feel stuck, try different approaches in your life or businesses. Actions engender change, and every little step brings you closer to realizing your creative dreams. Change for the better.

Check out my related post: How did a man from China beat the airline system?


Interesting reads:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28815318-let-me-out

https://www.livehappy.com/practice/reading/let-me-out-helps-unlock-your-creativity

https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-14-311095-8

 

 

 

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